Jim Long - Web Video, Content Marketing, Social Media | Verge New Media

Open Vs. Closed Media and Why It’s OK To Just Be a Content Consumer

Most good blog posts, or at least the ones that attract the most traffic, draw a line in the sand – taking an unequivocal position. So just on the heels of the iPad launch, scores of tech bloggers are taking that stand against the onerous, closed nature of Apple’s latest offering. And the Church of Open Media has issued it’s doctrine against the iPad decreeing it a heretical, “retrograde” device.

The iPad is retrograde. It tries to turn us back into an audience again. That is why media companies and advertisers are embracing it so fervently, because they think it returns us all to their good old days when we just consumed, we didn’t create, when they controlled our media experience and business models and we came to them.

iPad danger: app v. web, consumer v. creator -Jeff Jarvis, Buzzmachine

Update – The Chorus of Returns Begins

Your humble blogger here, updating as I sit in an airport terminal waiting for a flight to Mexico City to cover the First Lady’s visit. I felt I had to update what I published yesterday as we’re now seeing the chorus of “I’m Returning my iPod” posts.  Jeff Jarvis even made a video outlining his reasons.  Maybe this is a shift that will ultimately prod Apple to re-think pricing and exclusivity agreements with publishers.  Maybe it’s a few high profile bloggers using their influence and reach to voice concerns that are valid and point to salient shortcomings in Apple’s offering.  Maybe folks should’ve read the label before they bought it?

Why I’m Returning My Apple iPad ($AAPL)

Why I’m Returning The iPad

Look, I’m no iPad fanboy. I may eventually buy one, but I’m not suffering from the technolust that swooned those first in line to get theirs. I’m more interested in how the device will change the worlds of publishing and advertising. And now, the conversation is being framed as either/or in terms of participatory vs. walled content. I think that’s a false choice, and that there always will be choices in how we consume, create, share and interact with content. It’s perfectly fine to simply, passively consume media and that is precisely what the device is designed to do.

Lean Forward – Lean Back

I’m not sure who originally coined the terms “lean forward” and “lean back” media, but the premise is simple. If you’re not familiar with the terms, lean forward media is the kind we create, engage with, mashup, share, link to, comment on, embed in our blogs etc. Lean back is the kind we passively consume.

Examples of “lean forward” media

  • blogs and the comments on them
  • embeddable video
  • links to content within a blog
  • Twitter

Examples of “lean back” media

  • books
  • movies
  • certain TV shows
  • certain iPad content

Both of these types of media have intrinsic value and I don’t think we need to frame this as one replacing the other.  This blog falls into the category of lean-forward and I hope all of you enlightened readers here engage me and each other in a robust dialogue in the comments.  But what is it that makes people think that ALL media has to be like this blog?

What is wrong with people wanting to just be part of the audience?  I don’t buy this notion that every bit of content needs to be open to some online peer review,  or worse – the ill tempered trolls of the interwebs.  I further don’t buy the notion that all content – from blog comment, to link,  to twitter mention – is sacrosanct. Most critics of the iPad seem to hold this belief. To them I say: if you’re REALLY worried about the iPad hobbling your generativity… DON’T BUY ONE.

Walls, Windows, and Doors

Apple is building walls around it’s media empire. It want’s to set the price for apps and subscriptions and much of the content thus far doesn’t allow for much by way of sharing or commenting.  So what?  Apple is a company that’s in the business of delivering value to their shareholders.  How they get there – whether by open source or DRM ensconced walls -is up to them, not us.  The iPad is not a tool of individual media empowerment and as such, I’d equate it to a really great piece of stereo equipment.  It’s an entertainment appliance.

That’s just fine for most people.  If you’re reading this blog, you’re exceptional (on many levels).  Not just because you’re reading my blog, but that’s certainly a plus. You are part of my social graph, and I have to get your attention on Twitter or Facebook first to get you over here.   But most people aren’t this connected on the web.  In that respect, we are exceptional. We are the digerati.  But the self-ordained high priests of the Church of Open Media would have us believe that everyone is out there contributing content. That’s where I and others are given pause.

This is the place where this brand of critics fall most deeply into the same kind of echo-chambered trap as the news industry — by thinking that most people should think and behave like themselves. But most people are not and will not ever become creators of sophisticated media. Instead they’re working in bakeries and insurance offices and having babies and teaching people to play the fiddle.

Have iPad critics fallen into an echo-chambered trap like the news industry? -Howard Weaver

The social web allows us to create, collaborate and connect in ways constantly being innovated.  Social media, citizen media – whatever you want to call it – at the minimum, gives us a window into power structures like media, press and government – transparencey.  At it’s most open, we’re allowed through the doors and given an opportunity to help shape and create content.  Increasingly traditional media are opening windows and doors and extending their brands to online audiences. By and large these are good things.

But I think there will continue to be a strong desire for people like you and me to lean forward, engage, share, embed, post, comment and shout out to the world.  I also think there are more people in this world, who are just as happy to read, watch, absorb and ponder while leaning back.  Both of these approaches are just fine and I simply don’t understand all of the histrionics of this non debate – debate.  Am I missing something here?  Please lean forward in the comments below. :)

Related Reading

Consumers vs. Creators (or Will the iPad Destroy the World?)

Here Is Why The iPad Won’t Save The Magazine Industry

The iPad Luddites

  • http://rizzn.com Mark 'Rizzn' Hopkins

    I think if you're going to take this position, you'll lose too.

    This is a pretty inferior device to currently available alternatives for consuming content. Sure, the interface is nicer than most. That's offset, though, by the outlandish *cost* for consuming that media, and the fact that Apple, by it's own arrogance and self-interest, cuts out large swaths of the web from being available to consume by a user.

    • newmediajim

      Mark -I'm not sure I understand how I'll lose. Look many of these media critics decree that mainstream media is irrelevant already. So why does it matter if they can't cut and paste their content into their blogs? We're all the media right? Furthermore, Apple isnt' the only game in town and even if it were, I'd buy a new Mac Book Pro before i bought an iPad. The solution of both the “outlandish” cost of consuming the media on an iPad is not to buy one. I also claim ignorance as to exclusivity arrangements publishers have with apple. Are you suggesting that if a publish chooses to distribute on an iPad, they won't on the web? That sounds suicidal to me.

      • http://rizzn.com Mark 'Rizzn' Hopkins

        First of all, your tweet framed this post as a defense of the iPad, so my response is from that perspective – if “some people are consumers” is your argument, that, as a defense of the iPad, will fail.

        I think, more to the point of this post, all people want to generate media, they just don't necessarily want to call it that. They want to make recomendations, they just want to do it comfortably. The iPad isn't engineered to do that well, since media sharing is inhibited by the device itself shoving everyone into remaining into the ecosystem of closed and generally unavailble to the mainstream content.

        And yes, many publishers who choose to distribute on the iPad are expressly forbidden from doing so elsewhere by the agreements with Apple (depending on the circumstance). Apple is clearly drawing a line between the web and itself (section 3.3.1, as we know, excludes Flash, but also could be construed as excluding the web as well).

        • newmediajim

          Mark, I create content for a living and I create it in my spare time. I would consider myself an anomaly. If you're right, and “all people” want to generate media, then the iPad and its content partners will fade into obscurity.

          If i can't do something comfortably (comment, log in etc) I move right on. I'm very impatient when it comes to those types of things. I'm not “defending” the iPad as I don't own one. I just don't get all the histrionics around it. You'll blog, twitter, share, embed, link.. I'll do the same. We'll groove on each others content and that's ok!

          If I can make money off of a iPad only magazine that's ok too!

          • http://rizzn.com Mark 'Rizzn' Hopkins

            I think the histrionics come from apple themselves. They say they want to flip the paradigm of computing for every one, and their customers act more like cult members than consumers… Folks like me can only take so much of that before I respond with histrionics of my own. The iPad, despite what its apologists claim, isn't anywhere close to being all things to all people.

            Sent from my Samsung Code (WinMo6).
            903-253-0143 . guesswho@rizzn.com . @rizzn

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  • http://mikeabundo.com/ Mike Abundo

    “Here's something four-year-olds know: A screen that ships without a mouse ships broken. Here's something four-year-olds know: Media that's targeted at you but doesn't include you may not be worth sitting still for. Those are things that make me believe that this is a one-way change. Because four year olds, the people who are soaking most deeply in the current environment, who won't have to go through the trauma that I have to go through of trying to unlearn a childhood spent watching Gilligan's Island, they just assume that media includes consuming, producing and sharing.” — Clay Shirky.

    • newmediajim

      Mike I don't disagree with Shirky's premise. It would be silly of me
      to have a blog that links to other blogs, if I were “anti” content
      creation. I'm not. I just don't think creation is mandatory, just as
      I don't believe those who choose to passively consume are the
      unenlightened.

      I create content for a living. That's what pays my mortgage. I also
      do it it my spare time because I find it rewarding and enriching, plus
      I get to share ideas with folks like you.

      I simply don't think this is an either/or proposition

  • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

    I wrote about this very subject…

    http://shamable.com/2010/03/the-myth-of-the-dea

    The short version: the idea that people all want to create and don't want to consume simply isn't demonstrated in the numbers. For example, this post may get 300 comments but I'm sure Jim has more than 300 viewers. Not everyone wants to create and some people just want to consume. This constant drumbeat of “create create create” is just meaningless social media cheerleading.

    The opportunity was there, but the presence of an opportunity doesn't automatically create an impetus to take it.

    • newmediajim

      Vinny, thanks for stopping by! Look, I'll be lucky to get 30
      comments, much less 300! :) I fully believe in creating, sharing,
      linking, producing etc. But i gotta tell ya, I sling a 30 lb. camera
      around all day long whilst twittering my daily exploits. I try to
      churn out a blog post once a week that gives a viewpoint that
      challenges dogma, makes me and my readers think, and is hopefully
      mildly amusing. Sometimes though, I just want to sit back and watch
      “The Hangover” or “Bruno” on my Blue-Ray. If that's wrong, I don't
      want to be right! (said with dramatic flourish)

      • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

        I love creating (writing, photography, video) but that's me. They used to call us the 1 percenters. Somewhere along the line our percentages grew and it made the 1 percenters think there were a lot more of us than there really are and that everyone was one of us. They aren't. Some people are perfectly fine with passively consuming. The iPad may not be the device to make the next blow-your-mind video on, but it's not a bad place to watch it.

        Jarvis' criticism that it isn't as good for watching movies as his HD TV is so ridiculous it barely warrants a response, but here's some common sense: We don't all work in our homes, Jeff.

        Wow. Imagine that.

  • anna

    love this post. I have recently leaned more forward and joined twitter, have a blog, love engaging. It's wonderful I just wish more of my friends were on twitter! It's all coming I guess.

    • newmediajim

      But we all like to lean back now and again, don't we?

  • diveswithfishes

    “It's an entertainment appliance.”

    And *that's* why I've ordered one (with 3G, no less.) So I can watch movies and read eBooks and play games and send/receive emails and trade updates with friends on Facebook and…. And, I'll be able to do it without 6.5 pounds of aluminum overheating on my lap or, conversely, having to squint to see a 3″ screen.

    I lean forward a lot. Truthfully, I'm hoping my new iPad will give me more opportunities – and remind me – to lean back more than I do.

    • newmediajim

      Sounds like you want to use it for what it's intended for instead of
      what you wished it would be. :). I think some of these prominent tech
      writers are of the latter ilk.

  • http://www.ann-sense.com/ Ann Marie van den Hurk, APR

    I'm not surprised at the buyer’s remorse. Folks got caught up in the hype and the desire to be first to have the “best new toy” over all the other cools kids on the block without really knowing all the facts. The dream won over the reality. Sometimes being an early adopter isn't so great.

    I think a lot of us move between lean forward and lean backward medias. And that's OK. There are times when engagement is needed while other times it is fine to be passive. We need that. If everyone was talking would there be anyone listening and really paying attention?

    PS – Good to hear I'm not alone in not being a fan quite yet of the iPad. And I'm brand loyal to Apple products. I see it's value, but it won't be bring me any at this point.

    • newmediajim

      Ann Marie glad to see you drop by! You make two important points.
      People bought into hype before they fully researched their purchase
      and if we're all talking, who's listening?

  • http://banannie.com/blog Annie Boccio

    Oh, good. I'm not the only one thinking this.

    Considering the Shirky quote in a previous comment- participation and creation aren't the same thing. Wanting to interact and comment on content isn't the same as wanting to create it in the first place, and I think maybe the iPad fits in there nicely for those people who want to be able to participate but not necessarily create.

    I was actually thinking recently that I miss the days when a new magazine would come in the mail and I'd sit there for a couple hours, reading it cover to cover. Can't remember the last time I did that. But I can imagine the latest issue of some magazine arriving on my iPad, and settling in my lazyboy for a couple hours in the evening reading/watching/answering surveys/whatever.

    Of course, I've decided to wait for awhile to buy one, so this is just conjecture. I completely agree with you, though, that this is a non-debate debate. If the iPad doesn't fill a need, don't buy one. But I'm pretty sure it will be a huge success anyway.

    • http://www.insignificantthoughts.com Vinny

      If the iPad doesn't fill a need, don't buy one. But I'm pretty sure it will be a huge success anyway.

      Totally agreed. Of course that means having a filter, and most people don't.

      Coming from the perspective of a creator, I can only say one thing: not every device I have needs to enable me to create. My iPad isn't there to be a video editing photo posting blogging powerhouse and it doesn't need to be to make me happy. It's my couch-browser, and that's what I use it primarily for. No more snacktable in front of the couch with my MacBook Pro on it.

      • http://www.searchengineoptimisation.com Phil

        Its success already as compared to the iphone and i have seen 50% of my friends have it

    • newmediajim

      Annie!!! Nice to see you back here! I think Charlene Li described
      this as the “ladder of participation” in her book Grondswell.

      Each individual stands on a different rung.

    • http://www.seoconsult.co.uk Mack

      I also like the same and i think because it fill the distance between Mobile Internet User and Laptop users……….One is less heavy and other is too heavy….

      Having light weight ipad which can do all which is done by laptop is great thing

  • http://NewNetherland.us/ Rick Wolff

    If the iPad were marketed — or even designed — to be a stand-alone device, then its capabilities for creativity would be important, and lacking at first blush (although its iWork suite hints at better things to come). But like its tiny predecessors, the iPhone and iPod Touch, it's dependent on a mothership computer with which it must periodically sync, not just for charging. It's a kind of remote unit.

    And Clay Shirky's kid is now older. There's a video I saw last week of a two-year-old taking to the iPad like she designed the thing. (I went back to YouTube to find it just now, searching “iPad 2 year old”, and there are too many to count, much less watch.)

    I ran across a tech forum around the time of the unveiling of the iPod. There were predictable complaints about the limitations: inability to record audio, inability to use as a thumbdrive, the cost. Funny how we repeat history.

  • http://thelongview.tv/ Thomas Lawrence Long

    I'm a COEA (cranky old early adopter) of digital technologies, a scholar in the humanities. So my first foray into “content creation” (in 1970) was handwriting several lines of BASIC, typing it into a big machine that created a hole-punched paper tape, and running it to a mainframe via a telephone cradle 150 baud modem. Ah those were the days! Before buying my first PC, I was leaning toward buying instead a word processing machine (a single-function computer lite with printing device in one unit). What did I need CompuCalc for?

    If one is looking for a single self-contained distraction device (and who isn't?), then iPad is just the thing. However, I won't until it has the one robust feature that I seek from a mobile readerviewer device: the ability to annotate easily and fully. One more feature: the ability to easily navigate among page, endnote, index, bibliography . . .

    For the scholarly reader, both the codex manuscript and the printed book had an advantage, what is known as “critical apparatus” by which the reader can understand the sources compiled into a text. The other feature of this technology: marginalia (underlining, marginal comments, hands in the margin pointing to important material).

  • http://www.cognation.net deancollins

    totally hear what you are saying about content consumer V's content creator.

    although people on ipads can participate at http://www.LiveBaseballChat.com i'd much prefer to have people using a laptop who are there to add value than just consume.

    + 1

    Cheers,
    Dean

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I'm leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you're right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

  • ginnyATL

    You “tweet” (I hate that particular word, for no particular reason–except that it is more reminiscent of birds than people), I read. Laying back is the mode, until I realize that I’m leaning forward and, I think, making your point. I am an unknown variable. Not writing for the masses, and not reading them much, either. Bloggers who fancy themselves writers are often immune to the tedious necessities, at least sometines, of spelling, grammar and a general sense of literacy. Yes, you are correct. There are those of us who are online for a number of reasons other than making a living or “branding” ourselves. We do comment routinely, but not as a way of life. And we are looking to be informed and to be entertained—enthusiastically PASSIVE! Your are not just at a media crossroad, but also at the intersection of gender, generation, occupation and stepwise integration of all of these. There is probably a huge but only semi-interactive public looking for things of interest to them without the complexity of doing much more than, or learning much more than I am now. I think you’re right on the money with your direction.

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